Tag Archives: customer service

Anticipate Customer Needs Disruptive innovation

Don’t Close, Unless You Want to Close Forever


Outsmart your competitors. Buy the book


There are still many businesses where customer service and support is provided only during certain hours: if you call after, say, 7 p.m. Pacific Time, technical support is closed. Seriously? Does the firm really expect that none of their products are installed or used after 7 p.m.?

“CHANGE IS THE LAW OF LIFE. AND THOSE WHO LOOK ONLY TO THE PAST OR PRESENT ARE CERTAIN TO MISS THE FUTURE.”
— PRESIDENT JOHN F. KENNEDY

These sort of time-based restrictions are going to disappear for companies that successfully embrace the changed notion of customer service and customer experience.

Not because it suddenly becomes profitable to stay open 24/7. But because when you compete with firms like Zappos, which operates their warehouse 24/7 even though it’s not the most efficient way to do so, the notion of being “closed” will become suicidal from a competitive perspective.

Competitors like Zappos recognize that the value of delighting customers who order after midnight with a shipment that shows up on their doorsteps literally hours after being ordered can’t be measured by “maximized picking efficiency.”

They’re measuring the value of providing “a wow experience, which (their) customers remember for a very long time and tell their friends and family about.

[Adapted from the book Smart Customers, Stupid Companies by Michael Hinshaw and Bruce Kasanoff, available now on Amazon.]

Anticipate Customer Needs Reward Employees

Welcome Baseline readers

How stupid companies treat customers

Baseline Magazine did a great job of turning some of our key messages from the book into a web-based slide show.

Take, for example, their #5 slide, shown at left.

I’ve been extremely disappointed to see many companies use CRM as an opportunity to automate old marketing strategies, instead of launching more effective new strategies.

I once helped conduct a study of CRM that was sponsored by CFO Magazine. We learned that the number one indicator of CRM success was whether a particular CRM initiative had specific benefits to customers.

This may sound obvious, but it turns out that financial executives concluded most CRM initiatives have zero benefits for customers. Those that do, succeed. Those that don’t, fail.

It really is that simple.