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We are also trying to start conversations – either online or in person – about what it takes to serve smart customers. If you’re interested, too, please reach out to us.

Of course, if you’re interested in learning about the many ways Michael and Bruce can help your company act smarter – from workshops and speeches to strategic services or an informal chat to understand your issues, and see where we might fit – simply fill in the form below, or connect with Michael or Bruce directly at right.







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Connect with MICHAEL:

Call: 1-415-526-2651
Email: michael@smartcustomers.com
Web: mcorpconsulting.com
www.linkedin.com/in/mhinshaw
www.twitter.com/michaelhinshaw

Connect with BRUCE:

Call: 1-203-341-9448
Email: bruce@smartcustomers.com
Web: nowpossible.com
www.linkedin.com/in/kasanoff
www.twitter.com/nowpossible

Media inquiries?

To interview the authors or to write about Michael, Bruce and Smart Customers Stupid Companies, please contact Newman Communications.

Greg Abazorius
617-202-4121
greg.abazorius@newmancom.com

Tess Woods
617-202-4129
tess.woods@newmancom.com

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Download Chapter One:

Smart Customers Stupid Companies

How smart are your customers? If your company is like most, they’re likely smarter than you realize. How smart, you ask?

You’ll want to download Chapter One to find out...

Enter your email address below to download this free chapter from the book:


READ AN EXCERPT:

It is not a sustainable strategy to act dumber than the customers you wish to serve.

At the same time, everything and everyone has become or is becoming interconnected. Customers have smartphones loaded with apps that let them check prices, compare service agreements, read reviews, and check in with friends (and strangers) even as they examine your offers and products, and those of your competitors.

Consumers and businesses alike research, connect, and purchase online and over their phones without a second thought.

With these tools come radically higher customer expectations. Higher expectations of experience. Greater demands for personalization and customization. Lower tolerance for mistakes, for running through inane hoops, or for interactions that require mindless repetition (“... What is your account number ...?”).

In short, the world has changed dramatically, but many companies have not. Forget about innovation, they’re not even sure how to keep up. This is the challenge that your company needs to confront.

Companies that can’t pass basic tests of memory, flexibility, responsiveness, and innovation will die.

Among the many disruptive forces that are making it impossible for firms to survive with outdated strategies, four in particular are changing the basic ground rules for business competition and are the focus of this book: Social Influence; Pervasive Memory; Digital Sensors and The Physical Web.

Together, these forces will bring customers more choices, better information, and stunning new services. They are already providing individuals with tools more advanced in many cases than the most sophisticated commercial enterprises had just five years ago.

Put another way, they’ll continue to make your customers even smarter.

We’re just at the tip of this revolution.

For reasons that will become crystal clear as you read this book, established firms will need to reinvent themselves and disrupt their own industries to stay alive. With thousands upon thousands of very bright developers and entrepreneurs working around the globe to provide your customers with ever better, ever more disruptive tools, it’s a certainty that innovation will be coming to your industry if it hasn’t already.

Those companies who react slowly or tentatively will be increasingly marginalized, until finally, they’ll wither away. It may take five, ten, or even fifteen years, but eventually, these companies will be smothered by the competition and the growing demands of their ever-smarter customers.

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Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION

We are not talking about trivial change

ONE: SMART CUSTOMERS

Digital innovation is leaving companies behind

Customers start gaining superhero powers

Companies can’t be competitive if they can’t
stay ahead of their customers

Smart customers expect smart customer experiences

Key Takeaways

TWO: INTELLIGENCE IS EVERYWHERE

Beyond 1to1 to 1toEverything

Identify anything, anywhere, anytime

A framework for infinite opportunity and innovation

Innovators look through the eyes of their customers

What your customers could do with a pair of smart glasses

Technology is magic your customers need to trust

Key Takeaways

THREE: A PERFECT STORM OF
DISRUPTIVE INNOVATION

The four disruptive forces

Disruptive force number one: Social Influence

Disruptive force number two: Pervasive Memory

Disruptive force number three: Digital Sensors

Disruptive force number four: the Physical Web

Disruption favors the smart customer

Key Takeaways

FOUR: STUPID COMPANIES

Does your company behave stupidly?

What happens when smart customers meet
a stupid company?

Why CRM hasn't helped

Does this mean the end of loyalty?

Many managers don't care – and aren't paid to

Guess what? Your customers don’t care either

Dumb touchpoints anchor your performance to the past

Key Takeaways

FIVE: GET SMART

A five-step system for acting smart and growing faster

Getting smart: a simple system you can use

Segment your customers by needs and value

Modularize your capabilities to increase your flexibility
and responsiveness

Anticipate your customers' needs

Reward your employees for win/win behaviors

Transform touchpoints (and make them smart)

In summary: It really pays to get – and act – smart

Key Takeaways

SIX: CRITICAL STEPS

“If anyone disrupts this industry, it's going to be us.”

Welcome to simultaneous change

Be smart enough to learn what your customers really need

Start making your company smarter, now

Key Takeaways

AUTHORS

Acknowledgements

Michael Hinshaw

Bruce Kasanoff

INDEX

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